1. Jean Cocteau(French, 1889-1963)

    Untitled    1930

    lithograph

     
  2. David Hockney(British, b.1937)

    The Bell Tower   1969

    etching, aquatint

    From the Story The Boy who Left Home to Learn Fear. For Six Fairy Tales From the Brothers Grimm

     
  3. David Hockney(British, b.1937)

    The Rose and the Rose Talk    1969

    etching

    From the Story Fundevogel. For Six Fairy Tales From the Brothers Grimm

     
  4. Terry Willson(British, b.1948)

    Interior No.5   1974

    etching

     
  5. longhairshorttemper:

    Glenn Sorensen
    Sad day, 2011
    oil on canvas
    25.3 × 30.5cm (via Glenn Sorensen - Sad day - Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery)

    (via blastedheath)

     
  6. Odilon Redon(French, 1840-1916)

    Profil de lumière (Profile of Light)    1886

    Lithograph On China Paper

     
  7. Jayeates(American)

    Untitled (Church)   1956

    Black Ink And Opaque Watercolor On Paper

    Tagged #Jayeates #art
     
  8. Ludmila Armata(Canadian, b.1954)

    Roma NOVA   2013   etching and drypoint on paper

    Genera   2013   etching, drypoint and aquatint

    also

     
  9. Oskar Graf(German, 1873-1958)

    Dachau im Mondschein    1904

    etching, aquatint

    (Source: ebay.de)

    Tagged #Oskar Graf #art
     
  10. Oskar Graf(German, 1873-1958)

    title unknown 

    etching

    Tagged #Oskar Graf #art
     
  11. Tagged #Oskar Graf #art
     
  12. vintageanchorbooks:

    Franz Kafka died in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria, Austria on this day in 1924 (aged 40). His body was brought back to Prague where he was buried on 11 June 1924, in the New Jewish Cemetery in Prague-Žižkov.

    “I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn’t wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? …we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us.”
    —from a Letter to Oskar Pollak (27 January 1904)

    (via darksilenceinsuburbia)